23 Feb 2022

Sound Blog: Cottage Pier Composition

pier.png

Introduction

For this sound blog, I have compiled a short “drone” (or noise) inspired hydrophone composition made during the previous summer. All sounds are from Lake Saimaa (Finland), recorded from a cottage pier with a single Jez Riley French hydrophone. As with my previous sound blogs, I used a limited palette of effects, however, this time with the addition of a delay. Today’s post arises from considering potential research questions within sound studies, and the ecoacoustics of water bodies and underwater soundscapes. Not having a background in ecology, I have been focusing on the contributions that humanities scholars and artists have made in this area [1,6,5]. I am especially curious about the potential of what Kim De Wolff and Rina C. Faletti et al. have termed as hydrohumanities [2]. For future posts, I plan to experiment more in this area, utilising cultural approaches to the study of underwater ecologies. This includes questions of environmental change, and especially the rising levels of underwater noise pollution worldwide [3]. I am keen to read these issues through the lens of sound epistemology (“acoustemology”), involving efforts to understand the didactic role of sound and listening [4].

Composition

References

[1] Leah Barclay. Acoustic Ecology and Ecological Sound Art: Listening to Changing Ecosystems. In Milena Droumeva and Randolph Jordan, editors, Sound, Media, Ecology, pages 153--177. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, 2019. [ bib ]
[2] Kim De Wolff, Rina C. Faletti, and Ignacio López-Calvo, editors. Hydrohumanities: Water Discourse and Environmental Futures. University of California Press, Oakland, 2021. [ bib ]
[3] Carlos M. Duarte, Lucille Chapuis, Shaun P. Collin, Daniel P. Costa, Reny P. Devassy, Victor M. Eguiluz, Christine Erbe, Timothy A. C. Gordon, Benjamin S. Halpern, Harry R. Harding, Michelle N. Havlik, Mark Meekan, Nathan D. Merchant, Jennifer L. Miksis-Olds, Miles Parsons, Milica Predragovic, Andrew N. Radford, Craig A. Radford, Stephen D. Simpson, Hans Slabbekoorn, Erica Staaterman, Ilse C. Van Opzeeland, Jana Winderen, Xiangliang Zhang, and Francis Juanes. The soundscape of the Anthropocene ocean. Science (New York, N.Y.), 371(6529), February 2021. [ bib ]
[4] Steven Feld. Acoustemology. In David Novak and Matt Sakakeeny, editors, Keywords in Sound, pages 12--21. Duke University Press, London, 2015. [ bib ]
[5] Stefan Helmreich. Underwater Music: Tuning Composition to the Sounds of Science. In Trevor Pinch and Karin Bijsterveld, editors, The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies, pages 151--175. Oxford University Press, New York, 2012. [ bib ]
[6] Bernie Krause and David Monacchi. Ecoacoustics and its Expression through the Voice of the Arts: An Essay. In Almo Farina and S. H. Gage, editors, Ecoacoustics: The Ecological Role of Sounds, pages 297--312. John Wiley & Sons, Inc, Hoboken, 2017. [ bib ]

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